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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the attention is on china. the north's most influential ally. today on china report, we look at the response from leaders in bejing and what motivates their longstanding relationship with an isolated regime. >> reporter: chinese media were quick to respond to the rocket launch. tv networks ran a news clip using reports by foreign news agencies. but it took a full six hours for the chinese government to issue a formal comment. it was made during the regular press conference of the foreign ministry. >> translator: it's regrettable that north korea went ahead with the launch, despite the international's community close attention. as a member of the united nations, the north has the obligation to respect security council resolutions. >> reporter: china is north korea's neighbor and the most important of its fuel lines, also an economic superpower, since fighting the korean war together, the two countries have maintained close relations. in september, north korea held a briefing in beijing, calling for massive investment in a special economic zone. shape, and the only way it will improve is thro
is on china. the north's most influential ally. today on china report, we look at the response from leaders in bejing and what motivates their longstanding relationship with an isolated regime. >> reporter: chinese media were quick to respond to the rocket launch. tv networks ran a news clip using reports by foreign news agencies. but it took a full six hours for the chinese government to issue a formal comment.ititititititit press conference of the foreign ministry. >> translator: it's regrettable that north korea went ahead with the launch, despite the international's community close attention. as a member of the united nations, the north has the obligation to respect security council resolutions. >> reporter: china is north korea's neighbor and the most important of its fuel lines, also an economic superpower, since fighting the korean war together, the two countries have maintained close relations. in september, north korea held a briefing in beijing, calling for massive investment in a special economic zone. the north's economy is in dire shape, and the only way it will improve is thr
we're really engaging diplomatically with china and other members of united nations security council on tougher resolutions and possibly sanctions. >> making any progress? >> you have to talk to the ambassadors in new york and the sea to figure out what is going on. -- d.c. to figure out what is going on. >> in beijing, what is the view among the leaders you can tell of kim jong-u7n? -- kim jong-un? >> china would like all the parties that are part of this sixth party talks her to get back to the table, to see if we can encourage better behavior from north korea as opposed to imposing sanctions now and trying to coerce north korea into the fold. that is a difference of opinion of strategy. china really believes we ought to be engaged with north korea. united states feels every time we've tried to engage with north korea, they basically turnaround and failed to respond. >> what is the most important thing the chinese leaders want from you every day? >> the want greater cooperation with united states, because the understand how important united states is for their own economy.
and this brings back sweet memories of when china was very isolated during the cold war. in the end, there's a whole new generation of people who have been much more sophisticated understanding, but that i would say it's a very strong autonomic response to the united states beefing up its forces in australia and then they wake up one morning and burma has flipped on them. it was eternal in terms of their faithful allies. these things caused a lot of consternation. so the old fear of diagnostically speaking in china is to fear with sand and travel without. these things happening around them excite them. >> how much does it add to that anxiety is that all? >> is the most problematic relationship now in japan and this is not good. i have to say i think japan probably hasn't played this as well as it might have, but i think on the other hand it would be fair to say also that it serves china's purposes to have something happening outside his orders which can rally people at home. there's a lot of complex things going on in each of these reactions to foreign movements outside. >> which ma
and partners such as singapore and the philippines and expanding our dialogue in exchanges with china. we are also an handed our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes -- expanding our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes allocating our naval fleet to have a 60/40 split between the pacific and atlantic oceans, increasing army and marine presence in the region. locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific, including new deployments of f- 22's and the mv22's to japan. and lay the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f-35 joint strike fighter. the third element of our strategy is that as we do force projection in the asia-pacific and middle east, we still have to maintain our global leadership and presence by building innovative partnerships and partner capacity across the globe and using these innovative rotational deployment as a way to do exercises and training with other countries, developing their capabilities so they can provide for their own security. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has rein
history tv on c-span3. >> china's emerging global power and maritime strategy were the focus of a panel discussion at the halifax international security forum. panelists discuss the territorial disputes involving japan in the east china sea, cybersecurity and international diplomacy. this is an hour, ten minutes. >> welcome back, everybody. this session for miscalculation, china and the rise of confusion or confucianism. i'd like to hand over to steve clemens who's moderating this session. .. >> thank you all for joining us. when i was thinking about the title today and thinking about our panel, it occurred to me, and i went online to find a chinese event that is being held right now looking at u.s. grand strategy, canada, japan and india. there are no canadian, japanese americans or canadians on china's panel. don't have any chinese with us today but we should have a lot of fun discussing that our national strategies but involving in the asian pacific region and with china but i want to acknowledge that that voice wasn't with us today. that might give us more room to run. because we do
of course its friend, china is on the security council and has blocked those kind of actions in the past, jenna. jenna: interesting that you mentioned china. is there any indication that the north koreans had help from the outside? any sort of outside country with this launch? >> reporter: well there is no evidence per se but it is widely known that the north koreans could not get the parts for their ballistic missile program without having those parts flown through china, bypassed through china. there also have been reports on the voice of america that an iranian team of scientists have been seen recently, in recent days in north korea. so there is questions about the relationship between, and any help that may have been provided to the north koreans by the iranians. clearly the north koreans are very proud of this long range ballistic missile launch. the one in april failed miserably. and for the first time then they admitted that it did fail publicly. this time they extended the window and did not invite foreign journalists to watch this and simply announced when it was successful. th
for the group. he was promoted second-in-command earlier this year. >>> back to the economy now, china apparently going on an american spending spree. a chinese company agreed to buy a big chunk of insurance giant aig for more than $4 billion after the company got a huge bailout during the u.s. financial crisis. that is not the only bargain that china is picking up from u.s. taxpayers lately. stuart varney on this morning, head of "varney & company" on fox business network. good morning, stuart. good to see you. >> good morning, martha. martha: they're gobbling up our assets in many ways . what do you make of it. >> they are spending the money they have got buying american assets cheap. you mentioned aig. a chinese company is paying $4 billion for aig's plane leasing business. aig remember got $189 billion as a bailout fund that was back in september of 2008. the taxpayers still are the largest shareholder in aig. we sold the plane leasing business to china cheap. second item, a 123 batteries, americans taxpayers gave that company $249 million in grants and another 250 million in tax s
'm with the world journal. could you address growing chinese assertiveness in south china sea and east china sea? and given china just announced they will intercept the ship's that go into territorial waters. so are you going to participate in upcoming defense talks with chinese? and what message do you want to tell them? thank you. >> well, thank you for that question. of course the issues that are being placed today in a south china sea and other areas in the north and central, east asia, i think are quite complicated because of the nature of the territorial disputes, some of them historic, some of them now driven by the need for access to resources in those areas, and that's i think to some degree has motivated some of the activities that you see, seeing there. the u.s. position as you know is that we don't take sides on territorial disputes. there's many of those around the globe, not just in the south china sea. but we do want them resolve peacefully, without coercion. and that we call on all the parties there, including the chinese, to ensure that as they approach these problems that they
for its missile program in china. we know they buy things for their gas centrifuge program in china. some things are made in germany. probably made in the u.s. china has been a major gap in this whole system. on sanctions and north korea could face tougher action from china might constrict some of its ability to buy things that it absolutely needs for its nuclear programs. jon: you think it is likely american-made technology is helping north korea with its missile program? >> could be. i don't know the missile program nearly as well as the nuclear but what north korea does, it uses china a sense as a transshipment point because many companies, high-tech companies from america, from europe, have subsidiaries in china, selling to chinese industries and trading companies. north korea works that system very well to end up with those kinds of high-tech items from outside china. and so while i can't speak specifically on the missile program i certainly can on the nuclear and yes, indeed, north korea buys european high-tech equipment and likely u.s. equipment. so it's a problem. china has been m
.n. security resolutions. he also talked about china's decision to the aircraft carrier in the obama administration shifted À la terry resources for the pacific region. this is a half-hour. >> well, good morning and allow hot. i am glad to be here to talk to you about the pacific command, where we are today to where we see ourselves heading in the future. since the last time i was here, we continue to move forward on the rebalanced initiative after as directed by president obama. the rebalanced rows on the strengths of the entire u.s. government, including policy, diplomacy, trade and of course security and that the area i work in. for me, the rebalanced has been and continues to be the strength of the relationships, adjusting our military posture and presents and employ new capacities to ensure we continue to effectively and efficiently contribute to the stability of the asia-pacific as we protect u.s. national interests. of course the keys to success of the innovative access agreement, greatly increased exercises, rotational presence increases come efficient force posture in yeste
, but not included in what we know as the six-party talks, which are russia, china, north korea, south korea, the united states, and japan. we need to try to change the dynamics here, so that there isn't this provocation, because what you have along the peninsula is quite stark. you have this incredibly robust and modern south korea and this stark, dark nation directly across the dmz. >> victor, who does have influence over pyongyang? >> well, i think for many years, we believed it was the chinese. the chinese are the primary source of food and economic assistance, energy assistance to north korea. but then, again, the chinese had a high-level visit to north korea the day before that they announced that they were going to do this missile launch. so, even the chinese, i think, are quite frustrated. but at the same time, i would imagine that they're also not willing to completely abandon the north koreans, because they don't want to see instability in the north, which would then suggest instability along their border. and that is something they don't want to see. so china is really the country
to pyongyang. press articles hail the fact that china in anticipation of the recent launch had begun inspecting cargo on north korean ships in search of contraband. the question this raises is why has chi gnat not been inspecting north korean ships since 2006 as called for in a u.n. resolution, reinforced by another resolution in 2009. if u.n. member states would only enforce the sanctions currently on the books, north korea would be unable to ignore the swer national community and the civilized world. the time for coordinated international action is now. the time, in fact, is long overdue. with that, mr. speakering i reserve the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the squom from florida reserves. the gentleman from california, mr. berman is recognized. mr. berman: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in strong support of h.con.res. 145 as amended and yield myself such time as i may consume. sproy the gentleman is recognized. mr. berman: i would like to thank the sponsor of this legislation, ms. ros-lehtinen, for her leadership on this issue and her work in addressing the north korean threa
. >> reporter: the problem is there are very few options in terms of appropriate action. as you know china sits on the u.n. security council and has blocked efforts in the past to sanction the north korean regime. they are its only ally but a very powerful ally. it is not clear at this time whether china is willing to go along with any u.n. security council recommendations for further punishment of north korea. they are in violation of two significant resolutions but it is unclear what real authority the international community has in terms of punishing north korea further. jenna: interesting tie some of our top stories together. china continues to be a problem in syria. that is our top story of the day. jennifer, we'll continue to watch developments there. jon: watching the crisis in syria, a nation that continues to unravel. there are reports that more than a dozen died in a car bombing, many of them women and children. the state news agency say a car packed with explosives blew up near a school in a neighborhood outside the capital of damascus. we're learning forces loyal to president bashar
, park had seen the outside world. he lived in pyongyang and traveled in china and he began to tell shin what life was like on the other side of the fence. >> translator: i paid most attention to what kind of food he ate outside the camp. >> what kind of food had he eaten? >> translator: a lot of different things. chicken, barbecue pig. the most important thing was the thought that even a prisoner like me could eat chicken and pork if i were able to escape the bashed wires. >> i've heard people define freedom in many ways. i've never heard it defined as broiled chicken. >> translator: i still think of freedom in that way. >> really? that's what freedom means to you. >> translator: people can eat what they want. >> you were ready to die just to get a good meal? >> translator: yes. >> he got his chance in january 2005 when he says he and park were gathering firewood in this remote area near the electrified fence. as the sun began to set, they decided to make a run for it. >> and as they ran towards the fence, shin fell on his face, park got to the fence first and thrust his body between th
.n. security council. it's likely china will try to water down those provisions but it's also certain that the provisions will pass. >> you don't think china will try to veto it? >> i don't think they will veto it. they don't want north korea doing this. >> china is the only ally that they really have. i wonder, do you think it's possible they didn't inform china in advance of the timing of this launch? >> it's possible they did not. people now suspect that the information that we had that north korea was moving its rocket, something was wrong with it, was it an intentional deceptive move? they thought there would be attempts to shoot it down. they wanted to fool japan. they succeeded. >> and it certainly does strengthen the new young leader kim jong-un domestically. >> absolutely. they have been trying since 1998 to launch a long-range missile and they failed in the previous four attempts. they succeeded in this. it's not a rocket that can deliver a major warhead. there are marriajor hurdles to >> they have done in north korea where a lot of people are starving what south korea has b
a satellite into orbit. its neighbors are unnerved. even china expressed regret at the move. the obama administration condemned it as a provocative act and will likely ask the u.n. security council to impose crippling sanctions. the pentagon following developments this morning. chris lawrence there. what do you know, chris? >> right now, officials say that object that north korea put into orbit, monitoring it, analyzing it, but they confirm it is in orbit. why is that important? the same technology you would use to put into orbit is the same technology you use to develop long-range ballistic missiles, the u.s. condemned this act. they are worried about the marriage of north korea's nuclear weapons with this long-range missile technology. this is the type of missile that if it was successful, as it appears to be, could reach parts of the united states, alaska, u.s. military bases in hawaii. but a u.s. efficiently i spoke with who used to work on north north korea for the defense department told me, there are still areas in which north korea has not made it as far as they would need to i
. it was shocking. >> i was trying to get away from the camp and i ended up going north. >> did you know where china was? >> not at all. >> it just happened that the way i was going was toward the border. with luck and kunning, shin managed to steal and bribe his way across the border and work his way through china where he would have been sent back where he was caught. in shanghai he was granted asylum. in 2006 he arrived in south korea with not a friend in the world. he was so overwhelmed with culture shock and post traumatic stress he had to be hospitalized. he is 30 you now and has made friends and built a new life for himself. but old demons from camp 14 are never far behind. he admit there's was something he was hiding. two years ago he confessed. >> when he told me about the excuse about his mother and brother he didn't say he turned them in. >> you reported your mother and brother? >> yes. >> what did you hope to get out of reporting them? >> well, being full for the first time. >> more food? >> yes, but the biggest reason was i was supposed to report it. >> why was shin tortured after ratti
expensive to do business in countries like china. our workers have become even more productive. our energy costs are starting to go down here in the united states. and we still have the largest market. so when you factor in everything, it makes sense to invest here, in america. and that's one of the reasons why american manufacturing is growing at the fastest pace since the 1990s. and thanks in part to that boost in manufacturing, four years after the worst economic crisis of our lifetimes, our economy is growing again. our businesses have created more than 5.5 million new jobs over the past 33 months. so we're making progress. [applause] we're moving in the right direction. we're going forward. so what we need to do is simple. we need to keep going. we need to keep going forward. we should do everything we can to keep creating good middle- class jobs that help folks rebuild security for their families. [applause] and we should do everything we can to encourage companies like daimler to keep investing in american workers. and by the way, what we shouldn't do -- i just got to say this -- wh
is the economic power house already now and in the future. you have china militarizing in that region, north korea and so much commerce, money, and trade that everyone depends on now in asia. to have the militarization of the region by two such uncertain countries with uncertain tensions it is a chilling affect on the world economy. first the u.s., the national security concern about what north korea mooib might do. the deeper, broader, long-term concern about economics and trade in the region, but for them to achieve this kind of success with a long-range missile launch, that means combined with their nuclear program, by the way, of course means the concern now full tilt that they have the capability for an intercontinental ballistic missile launch, potentially in the future with a nuclear warhead and that could put hawaii, alaska and the west coast of the united states one day at risk. >> victor cha, when the government says at no time was the missile or the debris a threat to america. is it a matter of time before kim jong-un is a threat to america. >> it is only a matter of time and the time i
of uninhabited lands between japan and china. japan sent eight fighter jets after a chinese plane was seen near the islands. it was gone by the time they got there. china continues to claim the islands. the islands have been in japanese control for years. japan bought the privately owned islands in september. >>> some are calling it a break-through, north korea making its first successful long range rocket launch but less than 24 hours after liftoff a u.s. official tells cnn the country may not be in full control of the satellite. joining me is cnn contributor and retired u.s. army general spider marks. good morning. >> good morning. >> what does this mean? is this a setback for north korea? >> it's not a setback at all for north korea. north korea successfully launched something into an extra atmospheric orbit, albeit it's not control. they were able to build a three-stage missile and get an object into space. >> here is how leon pa net ta spoke about it. he spoke to erin burnett in afghanistan. >> this is a clear provocation. we've warned them not to do it. we've been very concerned about the
invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se must have been a dozen of us -- got together with the leaders of china. we were accorded every courtesy we could possibly be accorded because of the presence of senator inouye and senator stevens. they were like brothers. they called one another "brothers." they acted that way in private. they served that way in the senate as chairman and vice-chairman and vice-chairman and chairman of the appropriations committee. they single-handedly shaped our american defense posture and they did it with skill and pay troivmen--and patriotism and the that very few could have. several senators have mentioned how bipartisan dan inouye was. he was of the old school. not a bad school for today, in my point of view. he treated each senator with
to pay toward china and the middle east will not let him. there was a successful sabotaging program against iran's nuclear program and a ery new approach of iran's central bank and other institutions that continues to enrich uranium. is kind of're seeing the twilight of america's cold war imperium in the middle east. the u.s. will have a relationship with the new egypt but it will not be the relationship of a client state that we saw with's the minority -- hosni mubarak or on war said sadat. is the changing relationship in the country like pakistan after the osama bin laden raid and in states like yemen. they look over the horizon that bahrain and say, we do not want that. host: one of the papers this morning has a story taking a look at the change in leadership in specific countries in asia and highlighting what is going on in north korea, south korea, and japan. what does that prove for the administration? guest: you can put north korea in the same category as japan and south korea. they have taken power and have produced leaders but are still checked by the open society and by th
; either us going nuclear in the korean war against china or from the korean peninsula and south korea today being a communist state under north korea. i want to ask if gayle shisler is in the audience tonight. gayle shisler, correct me if i'm wrong, is the granddaughter of o.p. smith. raised by o.p. smith because your father was killed in the world war ii. so we have here today the granddaughter -- and raised by smith -- of a genuine american hero, is i'd like -- so i'd like to give you both a round of applause. la. [applause] >> and if there's one thing i hope comings out of this book is the marine corps museum corrects the notion even in the marine corps that chesney polar was commander at the reservoir. >> i'm so glad that you raise this because really, for those of you who haven't red -- read the book yet, this is far the most recognized and still gripping story. it's really telling a powerful story. now, is it true, tom, as you've just shown for us that you have a soft spot for the marines? [laughter] he has been accused of being partial to the marines at the expense of the army.
kim three seems to can consolidate his power. we are waiting to see if this affects china and their soup harris: you mentioned the evidence that south korea has found that the north will be able to fire at us, at our mainland, possibly come in the next two years. is there anything the south is doing at this point? people are feeling imminent danger. >> the south issued that warning about the capability about the missile tests. there is concern about the region, but it is very difficult to stop anything like that. we have some kind of missile patriots in different types of missiles to try to stop that. but it is very difficult if you have a three stage rocket to be able to bring that down very easily. but we did see before that last test that south korea and japanese and american forces were put on alert. perhaps bring you down and casey came came into their territory. back to you. harris: david pifer reporting live today from bangkok. jon: the fiscal cliff is a sport is a way. looking beyond the deadline, short-term battle will have a long-term political impact. let's talk
it -- and partners such as singapore and the philippines and expanding our dialogue and -- in exchanges with china. we are also an handed our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes -- expanding our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes allocating our naval fleet to have a 60/40 s plit between the pacific and atlantic oceans, increasing army and marine presence in the region. locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific, including new deployments of f- 22's and the mv22's to japan. and lay the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f-35 joint strike fighter. the third element of our strategy is that as we do force projection in the asia-pacific and middle east, we still have to maintain our global leadership and presence by building innovative partnerships and partner capacity across the globe and using these innovative rotational deployment as a way to do exercises and training with other countries, developing their capabilities so they can provide for their own security. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)